We Know How to Do This: my Inauguration protest poem

I am thrilled that my poem “We Know How to Do This” is included in the voices of dissent in the anthology If You Can Hear This: Poems in Protest of an American Inauguration. Published by Sibling Rivalry Press, the anthology is available through Amazon, or you can download a pdf of the anthology through the publisher’s website. 

 If You Can Hear This was just reviewed by Out In Print: Queer Book Reviews. The reviewer even gave a shout-out to my poem! Read the review here.

Feel free to share the link to the anthology! From the website: “In order to create the most visibility for this anthology, we’re also offering a free download, no purchase required.” Here is my poem:

We Know How to Do This

 by Mary E. Cronin

We know how to do this—

To breathe in a house with no oxygen

to drive in a township where you run us off the road

to dance in a hall where you leer,

assess

grab.

 

We know how to do this—

To speak in code

as you blunder and bluster,

smashing all the china

as you try to break us.

 

We know how to do this.

We meet eyes

We pass notes

We touch fingers

We laugh.

 

We are smoke.

We swirl around you

fill your eyes,

your nostrils,

your mouth,

as you flail

in vain

to banish us.

We are an idea.

We are timeless.

You can’t kill us.

We know how to do this.

~~~~~~~~~~~

The fact that the anthology is now available gives me added rocket fuel as I head to Washington DC for the Women’s March!

 

Resist!

Marching on Washington

Our country has a rich history of marching on Washington, to defend rights, to protest, to resist.  Two picture books I have been reading capture this dynamic perfectly for young children.

The Youngest Marcher by Cynthia Levinson portrays the energy and idealism of children standing up for justice in the civil rights era. To counteract the cultural dissonance of our current President-elect criticizing civil rights icon Rep. John Lewis, read this book to your children. Young Audrey Faye Hendricks participates in the 1963 Children’s March in Birmingham, Alabama, offering a powerful example of youth activism. With beautiful illustrations by Vanessa Brantley Newton, this book was just published this month by Atheneum/Simon & Schuster.

We March by Shane W. Evans shows a family rising early, traveling by bus, and participating in a civil rights march in Washington DC. Its spare words and vibrant illustrations leave a lot of room for the child reader to ask questions or let the story weave its spell. A perfect picture book (Roaring Brook Press, 2011).

The Women’s March is in one week. May it contribute to the great history of marches on Washington to rally, protest, and resist!

 

 

 

 

 

Parenting Through an R-Rated Presidential Campaign

So many parents are struggling to explain the dynamics of the tumultuous presidential campaign. Parenting Through an R-Rated Presidential Campaign, my op-ed in WBUR’s Cognoscenti, offers parents six strategies to help.

vote-here

Kids will feel the blowback of the election long after the polls close tomorrow in this history-making election.  They’re going to need us to decipher the noise and fall-out.  We can model important elements like civil discourse and political engagement.

Voting together is a great start!

OpEd Project, Boston
OpEd Project, Boston

*Last month, I participating in the OpEd Project’s “Write to Change the World” seminar. The mission of the OpEd Project is to diversify the voices we see and hear in our nation’s op-ed pages and media. The OpEd Project provided me knowledge, a boost of confidence, and mentoring from a mentor-editor. It’s an amazing organization and program! Read more about my experience here.

 

Pantsuit March: Joy in the Face of a Bruising Campaign Season

All the stars aligned, and there we were, marching over the Brooklyn Bridge to celebrate National Pantsuit Day and cheer for Hillary Clinton.

We were in New York City on a Friday night  to see Hamilton.

As if that wasn’t charmed enough, we found out about a Saturday event: the Pantsuit March.

March organizers
March organizers

I loved the details in the event posting for the Oct. 22 march:

Signs: We’ve got a bunch of awesome ones for everyone. Feel free to bring your own too, but let’s keep them positive. Love trumps hate.
-Weather: The great thing about pantsuits is that they can stand up to anything…sexism, inequality, and RAIN! Join us, rain or shine!

My wife Bonnie and I preparing to march!
My wife Bonnie and I preparing to march!

Yes, it was blustery crossing that bridge with a festive group of men, women, children and a few dogs. There were colorful pantsuits, plastic pearl necklaces, and energetic chanting.

Joyful
Joyful

In the face of so much negativity in this campaign, it was pure joy– something I won’t soon forget.

mom-2-girls

You can read more about the march here at the Huffington Post, which includes a full report of how it was organized.

pantsuit-march

 

Searching for My Sidekick, and finding him

Searching for My Sidekick: I wrote that essay three years ago, as I remembered my childhood friend Wilfredo on his October 12 birthday.  I’d recently learned that he had died, and I had an unsettled feeling, wondering about the circumstances of his death at age 34.

Reuniting with Wilfredo at Lincoln Center in 1980
Reuniting with Wilfredo at Lincoln Center in 1980

Many friends and readers responded to my essay, so I have to share this update. This past year I found Wilfredo’s sister, Jeannine. She is ten years younger than Wilfredo and I; she is an educator and a mom. She filled in a lot of missing pieces, about what a great brother Wilfredo was to her, about his career, his partner, his humor, his life in the Village, his battle with AIDS. We’ve shared stories and photographs.

I felt a sense of both sadness and peace, knowing how Wilfredo was loved, cherished, held by his family. Jeannine is now a friend and I’ve had the chance to talk on the phone to her and to their mother—the woman who pierced my ears in her Bronx kitchen so long ago! Oh, and Wilfredo has a handsome young basketball-playing nephew–named Will.

keith-haring-heart

You can read my original essay published at she.com, Searching for My Sidekick, here.

Happy birthday, Wilfredo.

Write to Change the World: OpEd Project in Boston

Who gets to narrate the world?

That was one of the questions tackled in the day-long Write to Change the World seminar, led by the OpEd Project in Boston in early October.

Macarena Hernandez presents to the group
Macarena Hernandez presents to the group

The mission of the OpEd Project is to “increase the range of voices and quality of ideas we hear in the world.  A starting goal is to increase the number of women thought leaders in key commentary forums to a tipping point.  We envision a world where the best ideas – regardless of where they come from – will have a chance to be heard, and to shape society and the world.”

group-oped

This was not a writing workshop. It was a mind-shifting seminar that challenged us to raise our voices and add to the public discourse.

The seminar was geared not only to women, but to other voices that are under-represented in the public discourse, in places like the op-ed pages of newspapers, on radio and television commentary, and more.

We grappled with the question, what makes an expert? We  were challenged to think about ourselves as “experts” in our respective fields (including higher education,  children’s literature, immigration policy, legal protections for whistleblowers, faith-based initiatives, and medicine).

mc-sergio

We learned so much through small group work, lots of interaction, and dynamic presentations by Becca Foresman, Chloe Angyal, and Macarena Hernandez.  Resources on writing and submitting op-ed pieces were shared, and we came away inspired and empowered.

Presenters Becca Foresman, Macarena Hernandez, Chloe Angyal
Presenters Becca Foresman, Macarena Hernandez, and Chloe Angyal of the Huffington Post

As one of our leaders shared, “If you say things of consequence, there may be consequences. The alternative is to be inconsequential.”

I loved the paired activities we did!
I loved the paired activities we did!

There are more pictures from the day here.